October262013

Hombres necios que acusáis

spanishskulduggery:

Hombres necios que acusáis de Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz (1651-1695)

*Translation and notes to follow under the cut

 

Hombres necios que acusáis

a la mujer, sin razón,

sin ver que sois la ocasión
de lo mismo que culpáis;

si con ansia sin igual
solicitáis su desdén,
por qué queréis que obren bien
si las incitáis al mal?

Combatís su resistencia
y luego, con gravedad,
decís que fue liviandad
lo que hizo la diligencia.

Parecer quiere el denuedo
de vuestro parecer loco,
al niño que pone el coco
y luego le tiene miedo.

Queréis, con presunción necia,
hallar a la que buscáis
para pretendida, Thais,
y en la posesión, Lucrecia.

¿Qué humor puede ser más raro
que el que, falto de consejo,
él mismo empaña el espejo
y siente que no esté claro?

Con el favor y el desdén
tenéis condición igual,
quejándoos, si os tratan mal,
burlándoos, si os quieren bien.

Opinión, ninguna gana,
pues la que más se recata,
si no os admite, es ingrata,
y si os admite, es liviana.

Siempre tan necios andáis
que, con desigual nivel,
a una culpáis por cruel
y a otra por fácil culpáis.

¿Pues como ha de estar templada
la que vuestro amor pretende?,
¿si la que es ingrata ofende,
y la que es fácil enfada?

Mas, entre el enfado y la pena
que vuestro gusto refiere,
bien haya la que no os quiere
y quejaos en hora buena.

Dan vuestras amantes penas
a sus libertades alas,
y después de hacerlas malas
las queréis hallar muy buenas.

¿Cuál mayor culpa ha tenido
en una pasión errada:
la que cae de rogada,
o el que ruega de caído?

¿O cuál es de más culpar,
aunque cualquiera mal haga;
la que peca por la paga
o el que paga por pecar?

¿Pues, para qué os espantáis
de la culpa que tenéis?
Queredlas cual las hacéis
o hacedlas cual las buscáis.

Dejad de solicitar,
y después, con más razón,
acusaréis la afición
de la que os fuere a rogar.

Bien con muchas armas fundo
que lidia vuestra arrogancia,
pues en promesa e instancia
juntáis diablo, carne y mundo.

 

Read More

Powerful poem. Sadly, it can still be applied to situations in today’s world.

11PM
atheonoasaraswati:

Sor Juana Inés De La Cruz

atheonoasaraswati:

Sor Juana Inés De La Cruz

11PM

(Source: loraxxgloos67)

11PM
home-of-amazons:

Portrait of Juana at age fifteen, painted in 1666.
Juana Inés de la Cruz (1651-1695) was the daughter of a Spanish Peninsular captain and a Creole woman. She was born in San Miguel Nepantla, Mexico on 2 December, 1651. For a woman of her time, Juana was well educated—and almost entirely self-taught, at that. She could read by age three, she mastered Latin, and she even learned Nahuatl, the Aztec language. She read many books and collected them for her library, and she wrote music and poems and became known throughout Mexico and Europe for her poetry. Juana asked for permission to dress as a man and enter the University of Mexico, but she was denied.
At age seventeen, the Viceroy Antonio Sebastián Álvarez de Toledo, the Marquis de Mancera, arranged for a jury of theologians, philosophers, and university professors to question Juana about a variety of scientific and literary subjects in order to test her knowledge. Juana answered their questions so brilliantly that she not only stumped these educated men, she also gained a reputation for her intelligence. She received several marriage proposals at the viceregal court, but she turned them all down. Rather than marry and devote her life to a husband and children, as was expected of most women in her day, Juana chose to enter a convent.
Sor Juana, as she was called as a nun, strongly supported women’s right to education. Many of her poems even criticised patriarchal social mores. When Sor Juana published an intelligent response refuting a famous biblical scholar, the leaders of the Church told Juana to give up all her scientific and educational pursuits, which they said were “unnatural” in women and told her to focus on her religious duties. Sor Juana finally agreed to go through penance, and she stopped writing and sold her library as well as all her scientific and musical instruments. She called herself la peor de todas las mujeres, “the worst of all women.” A few years later she died taking care of her sisters during a plague.
Fortunately many of Sor Juana’s writings have survived. You can read her poems here in Spanish, with English translations.

#feminist #sorjuana #mexicanliterature

home-of-amazons:

Portrait of Juana at age fifteen, painted in 1666.

Juana Inés de la Cruz (1651-1695) was the daughter of a Spanish Peninsular captain and a Creole woman. She was born in San Miguel Nepantla, Mexico on 2 December, 1651. For a woman of her time, Juana was well educated—and almost entirely self-taught, at that. She could read by age three, she mastered Latin, and she even learned Nahuatl, the Aztec language. She read many books and collected them for her library, and she wrote music and poems and became known throughout Mexico and Europe for her poetry. Juana asked for permission to dress as a man and enter the University of Mexico, but she was denied.

At age seventeen, the Viceroy Antonio Sebastián Álvarez de Toledo, the Marquis de Mancera, arranged for a jury of theologians, philosophers, and university professors to question Juana about a variety of scientific and literary subjects in order to test her knowledge. Juana answered their questions so brilliantly that she not only stumped these educated men, she also gained a reputation for her intelligence. She received several marriage proposals at the viceregal court, but she turned them all down. Rather than marry and devote her life to a husband and children, as was expected of most women in her day, Juana chose to enter a convent.

Sor Juana, as she was called as a nun, strongly supported women’s right to education. Many of her poems even criticised patriarchal social mores. When Sor Juana published an intelligent response refuting a famous biblical scholar, the leaders of the Church told Juana to give up all her scientific and educational pursuits, which they said were “unnatural” in women and told her to focus on her religious duties. Sor Juana finally agreed to go through penance, and she stopped writing and sold her library as well as all her scientific and musical instruments. She called herself la peor de todas las mujeres, “the worst of all women.” A few years later she died taking care of her sisters during a plague.

Fortunately many of Sor Juana’s writings have survived. You can read her poems here in Spanish, with English translations.

#feminist #sorjuana #mexicanliterature

(Source: dragonsupremacy)

11PM
October22013
September222013
January82013
gaelfeminista:

“Hey beautiful. I want to give you all my love… and I understand that as bell hooks says, that includes care, affection, responsibility, respect, commitment, and trust.”

gaelfeminista:

“Hey beautiful. I want to give you all my love… and I understand that as bell hooks says, that includes care, affection, responsibility, respect, commitment, and trust.”

December282012

Life

As I get older I believe more and more that the only unconditional love comes from a parent. You can say or do anything and although it may cause dissapointment they still love you no matter what. All other types of love has the potential to wither away or become bitter.

December272012
“"The courage to be is the courage to accept oneself, in spite of being unacceptable." – Paul Tillich”
← Older entries Page 1 of 5